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Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit

CULTIVARS AND NAMES OF LAGERSTROEMIA

VELMA’S ROYAL DELIGHT - WORLD’S FAIR

Lagerstroemia Checklist

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VELMA’S ROYAL DELIGHT
(Woody Plant Registration Form, U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC. 1994): Compact, dwarf plant 4' in height by 3¾’ wide; lvs. dark green; fls. purple; mildew resistant; root hardy to zone 6. One of six chance seedlings which came originally from Otto Spring Nursery & Greenhouse at Okmulgee, OK and was planted in Wichita, KS. Selected by Mrs. Velma McDaniel in 1987 and named by her in 1991; intro. by Dr. John C. Pair, Kansas State University Horticulture Research Center in 1991. The hardiest selection in shrub trials at the KSU Hort. Res. Center , Wichita , KS , having survived -18°F. Name registered December 5, 1994.

VICTOR
(A.E. Einert and V.M. Watts, Ark. Farm Research XXII(3):3. 1973): compact, globular shrub, average height of 76 cm following dormant pruning; lvs. elliptic, above Green 137A 2, beneath Yellow Green 146B, 3.5-5 cm long, l.6-3.2 cm wide, new stems and leaves reddish green in spring, retains green color until late fall; panicles 10 cm long, 9 cm wide; fls. late June, 3.5 cm diam., buds dark shiny red (Greyed Red 181B), fls. deep red (Red 53C), claw red purple (Red Purple 63A), old petals becoming grayish purple (Greyed Purple 185A); hardy to zone 7, may be killed to ground in zone 6; moderate powdery mildew resistance. Orig. in 1964 by Victor M. Watts, Fayetteville , AR. Intro. in 1973 by A.E. Einert, Fayetteville , AR. Name registered May 17, 1973.
= VICTOR DWARF.

VICTOR DWARF
(Piedmont Carolina Nurs., Colfax , NC . Spring-Summer. 1987): Deep red. Dwarf.
= VICTOR.

VIOLACEA
(Haage & Schmidt, Erfurt , Germany . Cat. p. 65. 1866, without descr.)
(Albert Schenkel , Hamburg , Germany . Cat. p. 9. 1887): Azaleenartiger zierstrauch.
= PURPUREA, LAVENDER, LAVENDULA, LILAC, LILAC PURPLE, PURPLE.

VIOLA COSTA
(Pépinières Jean Rey, Carpentras , France . Letter. 12/3/91 , without descr.)

VIOLET FILLI
(U.S. Plant Patent #14267): Deciduous compact shrub to 1.5 ft tall and 1.5 ft wide after 3 years; leaves 1.5 in long and 0.75 in wide, young leaves emerge slightly darker than 1-J, page 69, PLATE 23 [Dictionary of Color (Mearz and Paul)] on upper and lower surface of leaf, mature to 5-B, page 67, PLATE 22 on upper and lower surface; flowers 1.75 in wide, emerge and mature 6-H, page 107, PLATE 42. Originated from a cross between two unnamed/unpatented Fleming L. indica plants. VIOLET FILLI first bloomed in the summer of 1978 and was selected by David Fleming and Gretchen Zwetzig in Lincoln, NE. (Greenleaf Nursery Co. Catalog, 2013-2014): “With lovely violet flowers, this dwarf Crapemyrtle grows to only one foot in height and width. The most dwarf of the Fleming Filligree™ Crapemyrtle introductions from the Fleming’s Flower Fields.” Named and introduced by David W. Fleming and Grechen A. Zwetzig.  Name registered January 29, 2014.

VIVID ORCHID
(Louisiana Nurs., Opelousas , LA. 74:1987-1988): Attractive orchid flower clusters. Tree type.

WATERMELON
(Chris Philip, Comp.., The Plant Finder, p. 269, 1990-91 ed., 1990, without descr., as available from: CSun. CSun: Sunbeam Nurseries, Bristol Road, Frampton, Cotterell, Avon, BS17 2AV, Eng. Prop. Noel Kingsbury.)

WATERMELON®
(Hines Houston Plants & Prices. 31:Jan. 1993): Rosy pink. Listed under Standards: (18-25').

WATERMELON PINK
(Plant Buyer’s Index, 4th ed. 1939, without descr., as available from Jungle Gdns., Avery Island, LA, and Griffing Nurs., Beaumont, TX).
(Glen Saint Mary Nurs., Glen Saint Mary FL. Cat. p. 2. 1949): Fls. bright; panicles large. Also listed as WATERMELON and GRIFFING’S WATERMELON PINK.
= WATERMELON RED, BRIGHT RED, DEEP PINK, RED STAR
.

WATERMELON RED
(T.V. Munson Nurs., Denison , TX . Cat. p. 13. 1922-23, without descr.) (Griffing Nurs., Beaumont , TX . Cat. p. 21. 1930): Fls. watermelon red, panicles large and fluffy. Also listed as GRIFFING’S WATERMELON RED, HARDY WATERMELON RED, IMPROVED DEEP WATERMELON RED, WATERMELON RED IMPROVED AND WATERMELON RUBRA.
= BRIGHT RED, DEEP PINK, RED STAR, WATERMELON PINK.

WEEPING LAVENDER
(Louisiana Nurs., Opelousas , LA. 74:1987-1988): Weeping, Dwarf.

WEEPING PINK
(Griffing Nurs., Beaumont, TX. Cat. p. 12. 1930): Weeping pink. Intro. by Griffing Nurs. Spinel Pink 0625 1. Also listed as WEEPING.
= PENDULA, PROSTRATA, ROSEA PENDULA.

WEEPING RED
(Louisiana Nurs., Opelousas , LA. 74:1987-1988): Weeping. Dwarf.

WEEPING WHITE
(Nursery Business, p. 16, September-October 1977, advertisement Five-M Nurs., Lindale, TX, without descr.) Pendulous branching; fls. white with no tinge of pink. Orig. as chance sdlg. selected in 1956 by J.B. Fitzpatrick, Sherman , TX ; intro. in 1978 by Five-M Nurs., Lindale , TX . Name registered March 7, 1978.

WHIT I
(Carl E. Whitcomb, Information Sheet, unpubl., 7/29/91 ): Selected from over 65,000 seedlings for its unique flower color and growth habit. The base of the flower petal is raspberry red white the outer portion is white. Flower heads are large and very showy. Flowering does not begin until later than normal; under Oklahoma conditions, flowering begins early August. Plants have not set seed and once flowering begins it continues until cool weather stops growth. The growth habit is a dense pyramidal upright. Branching is prolific without pruning. Makes an excellent tree form with a minimum of pruning and staking. Lvs. are medium green and smaller than the typical species. Leaf retention is very good, with plants 3' tall having a dense foliage mass such that no individual branches can be seen. RASPBERRY SUNDAE experienced no dieback in the field from winter temperature of -5°F, -2°F, and 0°F, but was killed to near the soil line at -13 oF. Spring regrowth was rapid and normal. In Oklahoma and Texas powdery mildew has not been a problem. No determination has been made as to aphid susceptibility. Flea beetle damage has occurred. Cuttings root quickly and easily, whether softwood, semi-hardwood, or hardwood. Expected to apply for a plant patent.
(David Byers, Crapemyrtle A Grower’s Thoughts, p. 80. 1997): Each bloom is pinkish-red with a white edge, from which the name “sundae” comes. In full sun and hot summer days, the variegated flowers tend to be more red than pink. It has dark burgundy foliage and the habit it tall and columnar. Whitcomb says he has found terminal cuttings more often grow a plant with a central leader. Some powdery mildew in North Alabama but reported to be mildew free in Oklahoma and Florida. It blooms heavily in the hottest years. It will grow to about fifteen feet tall and has been exposed to -5°F winter cold with hardly any damage. Like most crapemyrtle it roots and transplants very easily. Whitcomb named it Lagerstroemia indicaWHIT I and added the trademarked name RASPBERRY SUNDAE™. This addition to the crapemyrtle world was patented and introduced in 1996.
(Dr. Carl Whitcomb, Lacebark Inc., Stillwater, OK, “Five New Crapemyrtle”, undated, unpubl. sheet received May, 1999 at U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC): Lagerstroemia indica WHIT I, RASPBERRY SUNDAE™ CRAPEMYRTLE. U.S. Plant Patent #10297. Flowers are fragrant (reminiscent of a rose). The plant is sterile, although a few seed pods do form. Fall color is orange-red. Growth is upright, more or less columnar. Terminal cuttings yield tree forms with a central leader; secondary cuttings or tip pruning yields a tree form with multiple stems but very upright. Mature height may reach 15 to 20 feet or more. Under extreme conditions in the fall some mildew may occur.
= RASPBERRY SUNDAE™.

WHIT II
(David Byers, Crapemyrtle A Grower’s Thoughts, p. 78. 1997): Lagerstroemia indica DYNAMITE® WHIT II was selected and named by Dr. Carl Whitcomb at his Stillwater, OK, research farm. “The crimson flower buds become cherry red blooms and are set against a background of thick, green, leathery leaves which start as crimson-toned young foliage. This cultivar roots and transplants with great ease. it is a vigorous, upright grower and, in the right location, may reach twenty feet tall. So far, it has withstood winter cold to -5°F. It is from the same parentage as other Whitcomb selections, RASPBERRY SUNDAE™ and CENTENNIAL SPIRIT, only several generations down the line.”
(Dr. Carl Whitcomb, undated promotional brochure, received May, 1999, at U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC): DYNAMITE® Crapemyrtle, Lagerstroemia indica WHIT II Cultivar, U.S. Plant Patent #10296. Flowers: cherry red; Flower buds: crimson; Foliage: crimson new leaves quickly change to green; Fall color: orange; Growth habit: single or multiple stem, very large shrub or small tree, 20 feet or more in height; very drought tolerant; highly resistant to powdery mildew.
= DYNAMITE®.

WHIT III
(Dr. Carl Whitcomb, Lacebark Inc., Stillwater, OK., “Five New Crapemyrtle”, undated, unpubl. sheet received May, 1999, at U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC): U.S. Plant Patent #10319. The name ROYAL VELVET® was crossed out and printed above it in pen was the notation “New TM Name = PINK VELOUR”. Multi-stemmed shrub or small tree reaching a height of 10 feet or more. Develops more secondary branches naturally. New lvs. are wine/burgundy and remain so for several weeks, eventually turning a dark purplish green. Lvs. are thick and leathery. Fall color is orange/brown. Fls. bright pink, uniform, with little variation in color during sunny or cloudy days. Crimson fl. buds. In Oklahoma, flowering begins early July and continues to frost. Very drought tolerant. Roots easily from softwood cuttings. Cold hardy to -5 to -8°F. If top is killed by cold, regrowth is vigorous. Highly resistant to powdery mildew.
= PINK VELOUR™, ROYAL VELVET®.

WHIT IV
(Dr. Carl Whitcomb, Lacebark Inc., Stillwater, OK, “Five New Crapemyrtle”, undated, unpubl. sheet received May, 1999, at U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC): PPAF. Cherry red fls. in huge cone-shaped clusters. Fl. clusters may be 20 in. or more in length. Fl. buds are dark crimson. New lvs. crimson, quickly changing to dark green. Fall color orange. Current season’s shoots are also crimson, providing a contrast to the green foliage. Seed production is modest and seed viability is low. Growth habit: single or multiple stem, very large shrub or small tree, 20 ft. or more in height; vigorous upright grower with only moderate horizontal branching. Very drought tolerant. Cold hardy to -5 to -8°F. Highly resistant to powdery mildew. Grows and flowers best when NOT pruned back in winter. Flowering best in full sun. Highly resistant to powdery mildew.
= RED ROCKET™.

WHIT V
(Dr. Carl Whitcomb, Lacebark Inc., Stillwater, OK, “Five New Crapemyrtle”, undated, unpubl. sheet received May, 1999, at U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC): The name FIRECRACKER™ was crossed out and the name TIGHTWAD™ was penned in beneath it. U.S. plant patent applied for. Flowers: Currant (light) red, more or less evenly distributed over the plant; some fls. with white on some petals, especially on fls. that open during cool, cloudy periods. Fls. are in clusters of 3-10 or more or sometimes singly. Fl. buds are crimson. To date, no seeds have been produced. In central Oklahoma flowering begins in mid July and continues sporadically to frost. Foliage: New lvs. are wine/red, quickly changing to purplish green then to dark green. Lvs. are thick, leathery, dark green, ½ to 1½ in. long or about ¼ to ½ the size of normal crapemyrtle lvs. Young stems are cardinal red. Branches prolifically, creating a low mound; mound form continues with age. Drought tolerant; transplants easily and establishes quickly. Roots easily from softwood cuttings. Cold hardy to -2 to -5°F. Highly resistant to powdery mildew. Flea beetles may damage foliage.
= FIRECRACKER™, TIGHTWAD™.

WHIT VI
(
U.S. Plant Patent #14438): Deciduous upright shrub to small tree to 9 ft tall after 3 years; young leaves emerge Greyed-Purple 187A on upper surface and lower surfaces, mature to Green 139A on upper surfaces and Yellow-Green 147B or 147C on lower surfaces; inflorescences 4 to 14 in tall and 4 to 12 in wide, flowers emerge White 155D and mature to Greyed-Purple 185C. (Pleasant Run Nursery Wholesale Plant List, 2012): “Burgundy Cotton has deep burgundy new growth, which sets off the red buds opening to white flowers in mid to late summer.  A Dr. Carl Whitcomb introduction. Zone: 6 H: 12’.” Named and introduced by Carl Whitcomb.  Name registered January 28, 2014.

=BURGUNDY COTTON™

WHIT VII
(
U.S. Plant Patent #14975): Deciduous upright shrub to small tree to 6 ft tall after 4 years; leaves 1 to 2.25 in long and 0.5 to 2 in wide, young leaves emerge Greyed-Purple 185A on upper surface and lower surfaces, mature to Green 137A on upper surfaces and Green 138A or 138B on lower surfaces; inflorescences 8 to 16 in tall and 6 to 10 in wide, flowers 0.75 to 1.75 in wide, are Greyed-Purple 183A. (Spring Meadow Nursery, Inc. Starter Plants Catalog and Shrub Reference, 2010-2011): “The darkest red flowers yet, distinctly darker red than Dynamite or Red Rocket. Darkness/intensity of red is less affected by cool, cloudy conditions. New growth is wine, and then quickly changes to dark green. High mildew resistance. USDA 7(6), AHS 12, 8-10 feet.” Named and introduced by Carl Whitcomb.  Name registered January 28, 2014.

=SIREN RED™

WHIT VIII
(
U.S. Plant Patent #16616): Deciduous upright shrub to small tree to 10 to 15 ft tall and 8 to 10 ft wide; leaves 1 to 2.75 in long and 0.5 to 1.5 in wide, young leaves emerge Greyed-Purple 187A on upper surface and lower surfaces, mature to Yellow-Green 147A on upper surfaces and Yellow-Green 147A or 147B on lower surfaces; inflorescences 4 to 20 in tall and 4 to 16 in wide, flowers 0.75 to 1.75 in wide, are Greyed-Purple 186B or 186C or 185D or Red-Purple 64D. (Spring Meadow Nursery, Inc. Starter Plants Catalog and Shrub Reference, 2010-2011): “Distinctly unique landscape appearance with soft pink flowers against nearly purple foliage. New growth is almost purple and persists most of the season. Upright form. High mildew resistance. USDA 7 (6), AHS 12, 10-12 feet.” Named and introduced by Carl Whitcomb.  Name registered January 28, 2014.

=RHAPSODY IN PINK™

WHIT IX
(
U.S. Plant Patent #23559): Deciduous compact shrub to 5’2” tall and 5’6” wide after 8 years; leaves 1 to 2.5 in long and 0.5 to 1.25 in wide, young leaves emerge Greyed-Purple 187A or 187B on upper surface and lower surfaces, mature to Yellow-Green 147A or 147B on upper surfaces and lower surfaces; inflorescences 1.5 to 6 in long and 2.5 to 4 in wide, flowers emerge Red-Purple 59B or 59C and mature Red-Purple 59A. (Spring Meadow Nursery, Inc. Starter Plants Catalog and Shrub Reference, 2013-2014): “This semi-dwarf, reblooming crapemyrtle has wine-red new growth and abundant ruby-red blooms. It flowers from late June to October, and does not produce seed. USDA 7 (6), AHS 12, 6-8 feet tall and wide.” Named and introduced by Carl Whitcomb.  Name registered January 28, 2014.

=DOUBLE FEATURE™

WHITE
(Inter-State Nurs., Macclenny , FL. Cat. p. 18. 1919): Medium growth habit; fls. clear pure white, panicles large and open.
= ALBA, ALBA PERFECTA, ALBIFLORA.

WHITE BEAUTY
(Wayside Gdns., Mentor , OH . Cat. p. 174. 1943): Fls. lacy white.

WHITE CASCADE
(Greenleaf Nursery Co. Catalog, 2013-2014): “White blooms cascade down to the ground in summer on this compact plant that grows only 12 to 16 inches high by 3 to 4 feet wide. Developed by B. Hambuchen Nursery. Can be trained early into tree form.”  Name registered January 29, 2014.

WHITE CHOCOLATE
(Pleasant Run Nursery Wholesale Plant List, 2012): “Wine colored foliage sets off the white flowers of WHITE CHOCOLATE Crapemyrtle stunningly. A POCOMOKE seedling selection, but Lagerstroemia x WHITE CHOCOLATE is hardier than its parent. From the University of Georgia and the Center for Applied Nursery Research Zone: 6 H: 6’.” Named and introduced by the University of Georgia and the Center for Applied Nursery Research. Name registered January 28, 2014.

WHITE CLOUD
(H.G. Hastings Co., Atlanta, GA. Cat. p. 38. 1961-62): Fls. white. Selection from the RICHARDSON’S WHITE Crapemyrtle obtained from the Chase Nurs., Chase, AL.

WHITE FAIRY'
(U.S. Plant Patent #7968): Deciduous shrub to 25 to 30 cm tall and 62.5 to 75 cm wide; leaves 6.2 cm long and 3.2 cm wide, young leaves emerge Yellow-Green 149A and mature to Green 137A or Green 137B or Yellow-Green 147A on upper surface and Yellow-Green 146B, or Yellow-Green 147B or Yellow-Green 148B on lower surface; flowers 4.5 to 5.3 cm wide, emerge and mature yellowish-white (JHS Color Chart 3301).  Originated as a cross between SUMMER AND SUMMER, which was bred at a research farm in Uchino-cho, Niigata-shi, Niigata-ken, Japan, and the pollen parent ISSAI-SARUSUBERI. Named and introduced by Kiyoshi Katsuo.  Name registered January 29, 2014.

WHITE LAYERS
(James C. Kell, Comp.., Houston, TX. Crapemyrtles in Cultivation. 1990:Rev. 6/94. unpubl.): Deciduous shrub/Small tree (dwarf); multi-trunked, lateral branching, semi-pendulous; overall appearance has a layered effect to branching; moderate growth rate; 6-8' in height; leaves long, narrow; fall color yellow, red orange; flowers white, more or less pyramidal panicles. Hardy USDA zone 7; moderate mildew resistance; deadhead for repeat flowering; originated by Five-M Nursery approximately 1978.

'Wichita' bark. Click thumbnail for larger image 'Wichita' flowers. Click thumbnail for larger image WICHITA
(D.R. Egolf, HortSci. 22(2):336-338. 1987): Deciduous, upright, multiple-stemmed small tree; exfoliating branches and trunk dark russet brown to dark mahogany (Greyed Orange 175A to 166A 2); lvs. elliptic to obovate, 3-8 cm long and 2.5-5.0 cm wide, dark green (Yellow Green 147A above, Yellow Green 147B beneath), in autumn russet (Greyed Red 180A) to mahogany (Greyed Purple 187A): infl. 12-35 cm long and 9-40 cm wide with light magenta to lavender (Red Purple 68A) fls., recurrent blooming from July to October; mildew resistant; Hardy zone 7b; orig. in 1972 from the hybridization of (L. indica PINK LACE x L. fauriei) X [L. indicaFIREBIRD x (L. indica x L. fauriei seedling)]; selected in 1975; intro. in 1987 by U.S. National Arboretum; NA 54973; PI 499819. Name registered May 1, 1992.

WM. TOOVEY
(Howell Nurs., Knoxville , TN. Cat. p. 4. 1927): Fls. watermelon pink. Red 54A 2. Misspelled as W. TOOVEY , WILLIAM TOBEY, WILLIAM TOOVEY, WILLIAM TOVEY RED, WILLIAM TROOVEY.
= RUBRA NANA.

WORLD’S FAIR
(Lone Star Growers, San Antonio , TX . Cat. p. 10. Jan. 1, 1986 , without descr.) ( Carolina Nurs., Moncks Corner, SC. Cat. Fall 1986): Deep red. (PPP)
(Greenleaf Nurs., Park Hill , OK . Cat. Oklahoma-Texas. p. 23. Fall 1990-Spring 1991): Pixie Series. Miniature, weeping, reach only 18-24" in height with wider spread; watermelon red (Pat. Pend.).
(David Chopin, Variety Listing and Descriptions, undated, included with pers. com. to David Byers. 5/11/95): Color: Deep Red; Height: 18-24".

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Lagerstroemia Checklist

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CULTIVARS AND NAMES OF LAGERSTROEMIA
COMPILED BY RUTH L. DIX -- December 1, 1999 -- U.S. National Arboretum
Posted to U.S. National Arboretum Website January 6, 2005 -- Revised May 25, 2005

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